The Harsh Coldness of Wintertime and Your Family Dog

You love your family dog ; you take care of it, while providing the food and water it needs as well as a place to sleep. This article will help you deal with the harsh coldness of wintertime and your family dog.

The Family Housedog

When it comes to the family housedog and wintertime, you need to make sure that the dog still gets the exercise it needs daily. Continue taking the dog for a walk or allowing the dog to go outside. Dog get use to and then depend upon their routines. They will not really understand why it is too cold to go outside. Besides, many dogs thoroughly enjoy going outside while the wind is crisp and clean with just the right tingle of coolness in the air that makes them feel frisky and free. In fact, you may be surprised to find that your family dog really likes getting outside and playing in the snow.

Dogs can be so very entertaining while playing in snow. However, some dogs may want to have nothing to do with snow for some reason or another. Nevertheless, while your dog is outside, provided it is a dog that has no natural breeding for extremely fridge climates, you should consider protective dog clothes for your indoor family dog. For instance, you can help your dog stay warm by retaining its natural body heat, while wearing sweaters, sweatshirts, jackets, hoodies, scarves, hats and boots as well as winterized windproof raincoats with fleece linings.

The Family Backyard Dog

When it comes to the family backyard dog and wintertime, you need to ensure that the doghouse is steady and secure in an area sheltered from the winds. It should be elevated in structure and sound enough to withstand wind, rain and snow. You should have an insulated doghouse or take the time to add clean straw for insulation. You will need to replace the straw insulation and bedding regularly. This is because the comings and goings of your dog will get the straw insulation and bedding wet and dirty.

If there is snow, you should shovel the snow from around it well enough that the dog can get to its bathroom area. Perhaps, allowing the dog to run freely in the backyard to enjoy the snow, while you are clearing its area and replacing the straw in the doghouse. Provide your dog with plenty of lukewarm water as he or she will need plenty during this time. If temperatures become intolerably cold, bring your backyard dog into the garage, carport or even the house, if you feel it is safe to do so. You may also consider a doghouse warmer to keep your dog warm in the backyard during wintertime.

Dogs Walking on Ice and Snow Melting Products

Ice and salt will accumulate between the toes of your dog whenever it spends any time walking on such surfaces and treated surfaces. You must either protect their feet from the side effects of ice, salt or chemical snow and ice removers. You can do this by training your dog to wear boots to avoid the problem. You can also apply dog paw wax or make sure to wipe his or her paws each time he or she goes in and out.

Article by Kelly Marshall of Oh My Dog Supplies, check out our cute dog coats selection online.

American Eskimo

The American Eskimo Dog (affectionately called ‘Eskie’ or by the German name ‘spitz’) actually descends from several German breeds such as the Pomeranian and Keeshond. It is not a close relative of the Alaskan Husky. The American Eskimo Dog was brought to America by German settlers in the early 20th century and became a popular circus performer. One Eskie named ‘Stout’s Pal Pierre’ became famous by walking the tightrope. Circuses popularized the breed by selling Eskie puppies after the show. The American Eskimo Dog was finally recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1994.

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The American Eskimo is a small to medium-size Nordic-type dog, which looks like a miniature Samoyed. There are three varieties: the toy, miniature, and standard. The American Eskimo has a wedge-shaped head with muzzle and skull about the same length. It has erect triangular-shaped ears, and a heavily plumed tail curled over the back. The coat is always white, or white with biscuit or cream markings. Their skin is pink or gray. The coat is heavy around the neck, creating a ruff or mane, especially in males. The breed is slightly longer than it is tall.
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American Eskimo Directory.

- Pictures of their dogs listed by generation. Pennsylvania.

- Pictures of their dogs and litter announcements. SeaTac, Washington.

- Raising toy and miniature sizes. Photographs, pedigrees, breed history, and an article on health issues. Perryville, Missouri.

- Breeder of toy and miniature companion and show dogs. Pictures of the dogs and a list of their accomplishments. Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

- Breeding toy dogs. Photographs of their dogs and breeding schedule. Stroud, Oklahoma.

- Breeding standards, miniatures, and toys. Breed information and litter announcements. Sherwood, Michigan.

- Pictures, litter announcements, and show news. Woodinville, Washington.

- Breeding for show and companionship. An explanation of their holistic processes for raising dogs and a list of dogs from their bloodline. Eastern Pennsylvania.

- Small breeder of miniatures and toys. Pictures and information on the breed. Minneapolis, Minnesota.

- Breeding standard sized show and companion puppies. Litter announcements, pedigrees, and pictures of the dogs. Ontario, Canada

- Includes show news, photo gallery and litter announcements. Hanmer, Ontario, Canada.

- Raising dogs for conformation, performance, and companion homes. Pictures, pedigrees, breed standard, and agility photographs.

- Breeder of standard show and companion dogs with photographs. Naples, Florida.

- Breed information, kennel history, and litter announcements. Wisconsin.

- Schedule, pedigrees, and information on the breed standard. Also breed Chinese Cresteds and Ragdoll cats. Anderson, South Carolina.

- Photographs of their dogs and contact information. Kincardine, Ontario, Canada.

- Breeding miniatures and toys. Scrapbook and birth announcements. Sangudo, Alberta, Canada.

- Photographs, pedigrees, breeding plans, and health links. Massachusetts.

- Breeding miniatures in Boise, Idaho. Photographs of their dogs and breeding schedule.

- Breed description and history, photographs, pedigrees, and news. Kalamazoo, Michigan.

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Alaskan Malamute

The American Kennel Club (AKC) breed standard calls for a natural range of size, with a desired freighting size of 23 inches (584 mm) and 75 pounds (34 kg) for females, 25 inches (635 mm) and 85 pounds (39 kg) for males. Heavier individuals (90 lb (41 kg)) and dogs smaller than 75 pounds (34 kg) are commonly seen. There is often a marked size difference between males and females. Weights upwards of 120 pounds (54 kg) are occasionally seen, but this is uncommon and such dogs are produced primarily by breeders who market a 'giant Malamute.' These large sizes are not in accordance with the breed's history or show standards.


The coat is a dense double northern dog coat, somewhat "harsher" (in a certain sense) than that of the smaller Siberian Husky. The usual colors are various shades of gray and white, sable and white, black and white, red and white, or solid white. Blue and white (slate gray with gray pigment) also is seen in the breed. Eyes are almond-shaped and are always various shades of brown (from dark to light, honey or hazel brown); blue eyed Malamutes will be disqualified in conformation shows, as they would not be a purebred Malamute, but mixed with perhaps a Siberian Husky. The physical build of the Malamute is compact with heavy bone, in most (but not all) cases. In this context 'compact' means that their height to length ratio is slightly longer than tall, unlike dogs like Great Danes which are longer and lankier in their ratios.
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The primary criterion for judging the Malamute in a show is its function to pull heavy freight as a sled dog; everything else is secondary. As many an owner has found out, the pulling power of a Malamute is tremendous.

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According to the AKC breed standard, the Malamute's tail is well furred and is carried over the back like a "waving plume". Corkscrew tails are occasionally seen but are faulted in the AKC breed standard (a corkscrew tail is commonly seen in the Akita). The Malamutes' well-furred tails aid in keeping them warm when they curl up in the snow. They are often seen wrapping the tail around their nose and face, which presumeably helps protect them against harsh weather such as blowing snow. Their ears are generally upright.

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Alaskan Husky

Alaskan Huskies (at least those used for speed racing) are moderate in size, averaging perhaps 46 to 50 pounds (21 to 25 kg) for males and 38 to 42 pounds (17 to 19 kg) for females. Some of them superficially resemble racing strains of the Siberian Husky breed (which is likely part of the Alaskan Husky genetic mix), but are usually taller and larger with more pronounced tuck-up.

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Color and markings are a matter of total indifference to racing drivers; Alaskans may be of any possible canine color and any pattern of markings. Eyes may be of any color and are often light blue. Coats are almost always short to medium in length, never long, and usually less dense than those of northern purebreds; the shorter coat length is governed by the need for effective heat dissipation while racing.
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In very cold conditions, Alaskans often race in “dog coats” or belly protectors. Particularly in long distance races, these dogs often require “dog booties” to protect their feet from abrasion and cracking so the considerations of hardiness and climate resistance prevalent in breeds such as the Siberian Husky and Canadian Inuit Dog are subordinated in the Alaskan Husky to the overriding consideration of speed. On long distance races they require considerable care and attention on the trail at rest stops.

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In Alaska and other extreme northern regions they are occasionally killed by moose in the winter. Infrequently, moose in search of non-existent winter browse of willows and mountain ash during desperate times of long cold snaps and deep snow will enter human areas attracted by the scent of fresh straw used as bedding for the dogs. True to their wolf ancestors, huskies tend not to back down from such encounters and an angry moose can easily stomp and kick several dogs causing severe injuries. Most moose/husky encounters occur during runs when a musher accidentally startles a moose on a trail. Most of the time moose avoid fights, but in cases of deep snow when escape is difficult a moose may confuse a sled team for a wolf pack and cause some serious trouble.

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Normally, moose are aware that huskies are domesticated, tethered and not a threat and will frequently bed down adjacent to sled dog kennels in order to use the huskies as sentries who will alert the sleeping moose of approaching wolves. Sled dogs tethered in far northern forests may be attacked and killed on their stakeouts by wolves when other prey is unavailable. However, this is rare. Professional dog sled racers often surround their lots with high fences to prevent wildlife attacks. More important is a low fence to keep out diseased rodents which can infect dogs by carrying parasites.


Data Refer:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaskan_Husky




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Alaskan Husky

Bichon Frise

The Bichon Frise (meaning ‘curly lap dog’, also known as a ‘Bichon Tenerife’ or ‘Bichon a Poil Frise’, if you want to be fancy about it) descends from the Barbet, a Mediterranean breed। The Barbet was cross bred with a small coated white breed to derive the Bichon. Bichons were classified under four categories: the Havanese, Bolognese, Maltaise, and Tenerife, from which the Bichon Frise ultimately descended. They were brought home from the Canary Islands by Italian sailors in the 1300’s and became popular pets for the French and Italian upper class, including King Francis I. Bichon Frises sank in popularity through World War I to the point of nearly being lost, but survived via their popularity as tricksters, accompanying street minstrels. French breeders in the 1930’s made an effort to revive the breed, which finally took off in popularity after being brought to America in the 1950’s.
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Akita

The Akita (also known as “Akita Inu” or “Japanese Akita”) is the largest and best known Japanese breed. The Akita was bred as a fighting dog in medieval times, and redeveloped in the 1800’s as part of an effort to restore several ancient Japanese breeds. In 1918, the Akita Inu Hozankai Society of Japan was created to preserve the breed, which was subsequently designated a natural Japanese monument in 1931. In 1937, Helen Keller’s guide dog became the first Akita to arrive in the United States. The Akita grew in popularity in America after World War II, when many soldiers returned home from Japan with them. Today, they are popular American pets and serve as guard and police dogs in Japan. The world’s most famous Akita, Hachiko, greeted his owner at a train station after work every day. After his owner’s death, Hachiko continued to faithfully visit the train station every day to wait for his owner, until he died nine years later. Today a statue of Hachiko stands at the train station and an annual ceremony is held in his honor.
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