Komondor

The Komondor is a large dog (many are over 30 inches tall), making this one of the largest common breeds of dog, or a molosser. The body is covered by a heavy, matted, corded coat. The dogs have robust bodies, strongly muscled, with long legs and a short back,with the tails carried low. The body, seen sideways, forms a prone rectangle.The length of body is slightly longer than the height at the withers, approximately 104% of the height at withers.

The Komondor has a broad head with the muzzle slightly shorter than half of the length of the head, with an even and complete scissor bite. Nose and lips are always black. People unfamiliar with the breed are often surprised by how quick and agile the dogs are. The Komondor's appearance is dignified and commands respect.

The minimum height of female Komondors is 25.5 inches (65 cm) at the withers, with an average height of 27.5 inches (70 cm). The minimum height of male Komondors is 27.5 inches (70 cm) with an average height of 31.5 inches (80 cm). No upper height limit is given.Komondor females on average weigh between 88–110 lb (40–50 kg) and Komondor males weigh on average between 110–132 lb (50–60 kg).

The Komondor's temperament is like that of most livestock guarding dogs;it is calm and steady when things are normal, but in case of trouble, the dog will fearlessly defend its charges. It was bred to think and act independently and make decisions on his own.

It is affectionate with its family and gentle with the children and friends of the family. Although wary of strangers, they can accept them when it is clear that no harm is meant,but is instinctively very protective of its family, home and possessions.The Komondor is good with other family pets but is intolerant to trespassers and teasing, and is not a good dog for city life. The dog is vigilant, will rest in the daytime, keeping an eye on the surroundings, but at night is constantly moving, patrolling the place, moving up and down around the whole area.The dogs usually knock down intruders and keep them down until the owner arrives.Hungarian Komondor breeders used to say that an intruder may be allowed to enter the property guarded by a Komondor, but he will not be allowed to come out again.



Komondor



Komondor Dog Club Directory



- Breed and club information, plus a great photo.

- Breed information, and photographs.

- Origins and early history.

- Official description of the breed as provided by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

- Information, links and photos of Komondors in the UK.

- Articles on breed characteristics and temperament, breed specific health resources, newsletter, and the largest Komondor merchandise selection anywhere!

- Photos, links and information in German and English. Also includes a photo of a Racka sheep.


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Maltese

The Maltese is a small breed of dog in the toy group, known for its silky white hair, though many owners of pet Maltese give them a short "puppy cut" for ease of grooming.The Maltese breed is descended from dogs originating in the Central Mediterranean Area. The breed name and origins are generally understood to derive from the Mediterranean island of Malta; however, the name is sometimes described with reference to the Adriatic island of Méléda, or a defunct Sicilian town called Melita.

The Maltese had been recognized as a FCI breed under the patronage of Italy in 1954, at the annual meeting in Interlaken, Switzerland. The current FCI standard is dated November 27, 1989, and the latest translation from Italian to English is dated April 6, 1998. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1888, its latest standard being from March 10, 1964.

The coat is long and silky and lacks an undercoat. The color is pure white; although cream or light lemon ears are permissible, they are not regarded as desirable. Also, a pale ivory tinge is permitted. In some standards, traces of pale orange shades are tolerated, but considered an imperfection.

Adult Maltese range from roughly 5 to 12 lb (2.3 to 5.4 kg), though breed standards, as a whole, call for weights between 4 and 7 lb (1.8 and 3.2 kg). There are variations depending on which standard is being used. Many, like the American Kennel Club, call for a weight that is ideally less than 7 lb with between 4 and 6 lb preferred.



Maltese




Maltese Dog Club Directory

- Club established in 1963. Breed information, contact list, and Specialty information.

- Breeder with pictures, and with help articles on training. AL.
- Breeder has standard, history, faq and pictures. WA.
- Breeder has pictures, information on tear staining and breed history. AL.
- Breeder of champion Maltese. Email lists, pictures, advice on tear staining. Palo Alto, CA.
- Breeder of champion Maltese dogs. Photos and pedigrees. FL.
- Breeder has show pictures of dogs and other links of interest.
- Pictures and links. Located in Colorado.
- Breeder has pictures. Located in CA.
- Breeder has photos of dogs. Located in Tn.
- Breeder has show pictures. SC.
- Breeder has show photos and info. Located in Ashland City, TN.
- Breeder with pictures of dogs. OK.
- Breeders/exhibitors of champion Maltese with pictures and pedigrees. Located in Brandon, FL.



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King Charles Spaniel

The King Charles Spaniel (also known as the English Toy Spaniel) is a breed of small dog of the Spaniel type. The similar Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a different breed. The Cavalier is slightly larger, has a flat head and a longer nose, while the "Charlie" is smaller, has a domed head and flat face.

The English Toy Spaniel is a compact, cobby and essentially square toy dog possessed of a short-nosed, domed head, a merry and affectionate demeanor and a silky, flowing coat. The ears of the King Charles Spaniel are very long and set low and close to the head, fringed with heavy feathering.

Like its larger cousin, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, the King Charles Spaniel has a silky, often slightly wavy coat. It tends to be shorter than that of Cavaliers.

This breed also comes in the same color varieties as the Cavalier: Blenheim (brown-and-white), Prince Charles (tricolor), King Charles (black-and-tan), and Ruby (solid red).Originally, each of these color patterns was regarded as a separate breed, but in the late 1800s the four varieties were consolidated into a single breed.

The American Kennel Club has two classes: English Toy Spaniel (B/PC) (Blenheim and Prince Charles) and English Toy Spaniel (R/KC).


King Charles Spaniel



King Charles Spaniel Dog Club Directory


- This regional club site has pages for Breed History, Standard, Code of Ethics, Club Activities, Local Rescue, Pictures, Club Officers, as well as local Breeder Referral.
- Code of ethics, rescue information, events calendar, and a membership application.
- The national Cavalier club of Canada.
- AKC licensed club in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Includes information about their specialty shows, events, health clinics, news, and membership.
- Regional club licensed by the American Kennel Club. Featuring specialty shows, show results, puppy matches, rescue, photos, information about cavaliers. Local contacts for the Atlanta, Georgia area.

- An AKC regional club dedicated to the health and welfare of the Cavalier. Site has standards, links to health issues, reference books and other pertinent issues.

- The original registry for the breed in the U.S.A. Offers information about the breed, breeders, rescue, events, and membership.
- Regional AKC Club with information on breeder referral and rescue. Cavalier Health information, health clinic, events calendar, based near Michigan.
- An AKC affiliated club. Includes details of upcoming meetings, shows, membership and rescue information, newsletters and photographs.
- Breed information, club history and rescue stories. For fanciers in East Anglia and surrounding counties. UK.
- Club description, calendar of events and special emphasis on rescue activities. Located in northeast England.
- AKC Regional club dedicated to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
- Breed club for Scotland with club information, events and rescue services.
- A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel breed club for the South of England. Breed information, club events and rescue services.


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Kerry Blue Terrier

Some characteristics of the Kerry Blue Terrier include a long head, flat skull, deep chest, and a soft wavy to curly coat that comes in several shades of blue (from blue-black to light slate grey). The coat is considered to have more "color" or to be more "blue" when it carries more of the grey/blue color (or the lighter the coat is). Puppies are born black; the blue appears gradually as the puppy grows older, usually up to 2 years of age. All kennel clubs have statements in their standard similar to that of the American Kennel Club: "Black on the muzzle, head, ears, tail and feet is permissible at any age." This indicates the presence of the melanistic mask gene. The ideal Kerry should be 18-1/2 inches at the withers for a male, slightly less for the female. The most desirable weight for a fully developed male is from 33-40 pounds, females weighing proportionately less.

The coat is the key feature of the Kerry. It is soft and wavy with no undercoat. The texture is similar to that of fine human hair and like human hair is not shed but continues to grow throughout the year. This means the Kerry Blue requires very regular grooming (at least once per week) and clipping an average of every 6 weeks.

Kerry Blue Terriers are strong-headed and highly spirited. They have always been loyal and affectionate towards their owners and very gentle towards children.
In the early days of competitive dog showing the Irish Kennel Club required Kerries to pass a "gameness" test, known as Teastas Mor certification, before they were deemed worthy of being judged. These tests included catching rabbits and bringing a badger to bay in its set. They are fast, strong, and intelligent. They do well in obedience, dog agility, sheep herding, and tracking. They have been used as police dogs in Ireland. Modern breeders have attempted to retain high spirits whilst breeding out aggression.

As a long-legged breed, the activity level of the Kerry Blue Terrier ranges from moderate to high. They require an active, skilled owner who can provide them with early socialization and obedience training. Kerries require daily exercise.



Kerry Blue Terrier




Kerry Blue Terrier Dog Club Directory


- Meeting schedule, club history, by-laws, code of ethics, and rescue information. Based in New York and serving the Tri-State area.

- News, membership application, breed standard, show schedule, and resources.

- Breed description and standard, things to consider before purchasing a dog, grooming tips, calendar of events, newsletter, and a list of breeders.

- Show results, news, forum, pictures, and a list of breeders.

- Breed description, photographs, events calendar, forum, and rescue information.



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Bearded Collie

The Bearded Collie ranks 104 out of 155 breeds in popularity in the United States, according to the American Kennel Club's yearly publishing of breed rankings.A Bearded Collie is best obtained from a reputable dog breeder or a dog rescue[citation needed]. Bearded Collies make excellent pets for those who are willing to accommodate their high energy level and grooming requirements. Weekly brushing is mandatory for keeping their long hair mat-free. Some Bearded Collie owners opt to keep their pets in a "puppy cut" haircut, which does reduce the need for brushing, but does not eliminate it. Bearded Collies are a very high energy breed, originally bred to work in the Scottish Highlands herding sheep. Beardies also excel at dog agility trials. A loyal and family friendly canine, the beardie can add years of pet ownership enjoyment to the home. They have keen problem solving abilities, and are a source of amusement to watch. Females are often more outgoing and headstrong than male beardies. When being trained, males are more likely to follow your instructions, whereas females don't like to be told what to do as much. Females often become the dominant dog if there is a boy and a girl beardie in the household. Regardless of the dog's sex, beardies are high energy. One of the most common problems for new beardie owners is the breed's high ages of maturity, so that standard puppy issues last longer and beardies frequently fail "puppy school" if entered at the same age as other breeds.

Adopting: Adopting a Beardie should be done through authorized breeders. (6) Parents of pup should have pedigree papers. There are Beardie rescue associations such as Beardie Collie Rescue and 'Rescue Me'. These organizations attempt to place unwanted puppies and dogs into appropriate and loving homes.

The Bearded Collie was used to herd both sheep and cattle. As such it is essentially a working dog, at one time bred to be hardy and reliable, able to stand up to the harshest conditions, and the toughest sheep. The "working bearded collie" became less common in the last few decades and might have died out, but thanks to the efforts of relatively few shepherds such as Tom Muirhead and Peter Wood and breeders like Brian Plummer the "working beardie" has survived and is becoming more popular. It has been exported to Australia and the United States, and finds favour among those looking for an independent and intelligent sheep dog. The purpose of the Working Bearded Collie Society is to preserve the working abilities of the non-registered working dogs from 'bearded' ancestors. The web site Shepherds with beardies contains a lot of valuable information on the few remaining working beardies.


Bearded Collie



Bearded Collie Dog Club Directory

- A large site with several important reference sections about the Bearded Collie dog breed. Also contains information about joining the club, pictures and articles.
- Information on Bearded Collies, the club, and rescue.
- Formed in 1997, the club now has official recognition from the Kennel Union of Southern Africa. Activity and information on joining.
- Includes photos, show results, membership information and event listings. Australia.
- Information on the breed and club activities. United Kingdom.
- Includes club information, litter listings and helpful information on the breed.
- Information on the club and club activities, in Central and Northern New Jersey.
- Located in Michigan and serving members in the Great Lakes area. Club Events, boutique, photographs and information on Bearded Collies.
- A group of owners in New England that get together to have fun with their dogs. Photographs, mailing list, and links.
- Includes list of breeders in Maryland and Virginia, tips on finding a reputable breeder, and show and trial information.
- Events, club information and special areas for Herding and Agility. This club is over 20 years old and shares its history.
- Sections on all areas of activities from obedience to herding. Rescue and breed information.
- For those interested in agility. Features information and results from competitions, photographs, events and articles.


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Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Puppies have a dark coat of either red, brown, mahogany or white. The muzzle and ears of Wheaten puppies may be black or dark brown. The dark puppy coat gradually grows out to nearly white before maturing into a wheaten-colored coat as they get older. The color can range from wheat to white, but white coats are not considered desirable by breeders and show enthusiasts. The adult coat may contain black, white, or darker brown "guard" hairs in addition to the lighter wheaten-coloured hair. If adults ever have skin injuries the resulting hair growth will be the dark color of their puppy coat before it eventually grows out to the wheat color.

The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier is a medium-sized dog, which ranges on average anywhere from 17 to 19 inches and weighs about 30 to 45 pounds. The breed has a square structure and is well built. Its hair does not shed like most dogs; like human hair and Poodle hair, it keeps growing, needs regular trimming, and drops just a few hairs daily.

The Irish coat tends to be thinner and silkier than the American variety.

The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier is an energetic and playful dog. They require patience and consistent positive training. Harsh methods will often result in fear aggression. A positive, even-handed approach works best with these intelligent yet headstrong terriers. They are enthusiastic greeters and will often jump up in order to lick a person's face, commonly referred to as the "Wheaten greetin'"These dogs do best when they are exercised regularly. They are cool weather dogs and can become easily overheated in hot weather. They are very good with children. If socialized with cats as puppies they will get along fine with them; if not, care should be taken in introducing them to cats. Wheatens get along well with other dogs if properly socialized. They are extremely friendly and loving pets. Wheatens are very protective of their families, and although they may bark an alert at strangers, they rarely get aggressive. Many Wheaten owners thus say that Wheatens make great watch dogs but poor guard dogs.



Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier



Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Dog Club Directory

- The Soft Coated Wheaten Club of Finland
- To enhance the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier breed and to provide support services for our club members
- Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Association of Canada Buyer's Guide Website
- Club information, breed information, buyer's guide.
- Includes a history of the club and a listing of the clubs activities, information on the SCWT and a local breeders list.
- Irish Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Club Of Ireland
- Club events, information, show schedules, and breeder referrals.
- Dedicated to maintaining the Wheaten's outstanding spirit, health and beauty. The Club plans many educational and social activities such as guest speakers, grooming seminars, fun days and puppy matches for both pet and show owners.
- Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Fancier's Association of Ontario



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